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Positive Behavior Intervention Supports (PBIS)

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS & SUPPORTS (PBIS)

The PBIS model revolves around the belief that every student can learn and that every child has specific needs.  It is the mission of the PBIS system to help students find success in school.  PBIS helps students experience academic success by providing a nurturing, positive academic environment.  All staff members will be provided with the tools necessary for addressing school-wide discipline in a proactive manner by teaching and rewarding expected behaviors. 

If you would like more information regarding PBIS, please contact Krystle Pumarejo at 276-3185 or kpumarejo@centralusd.k12.ca.us.

DISTRICT GOAL

A primary goal of Central Unified is that all students have access to the most effective and accurately implemented instructional best practices and behavioral practices and interventions possible.  Positive Behavior Interventions & Supports (PBIS) is a decision making framework that guides selection, integration, and implementation of the best evidence-based behavioral practices for improving important academic and behavior outcomes for all students. All schools in Central Unified in partnership with Fresno County Office of Education have been and will continue receiving PBIS school team trainings to support implementation of PBIS at exemplar levels. School teams are composed of teachers, parents, administrators, school bus drivers, food service workers, and school psychologists.  In addition, to each school site having a PBIS team, the district office has a District Office PBIS team to help insure consistency of implementation.

PBIS is a preventative approach to working with students demonstrating behavior difficulties. The Primary Prevention of positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) consists of rules, routines, and physical arrangements that are developed and taught by school staff to prevent initial occurrences of behavior the school would like to target for change.  For example, a school team may determine that disrespect for self, others, and property is a set of behaviors they would like to target for change.  They may choose the positive reframing of that behavior and make that one of their behavioral expectations.  Respect Yourself, Others, and Property would be one of their behavioral expectations.  Research indicates that 3-5 behavioral expectations that are positively stated, easy to remember, and significant to the climate are best.